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With every click Domex will contribute Rs.5 for making villages open defecation free.
#ToiletForBabli

BABLI REALLY NEEDS TO USE THE TOILET!
CAN YOU HELP HER FIND ONE?

About DOMEX:

Domex (known as Domestos globally) is one of the World’s leading hygiene brands. Domex products are available in 35 countries, killing germs and keeping families protected worldwide. To help improve general hygiene and health standards in communities around the world, Domex works closely with scientific bodies and other major organisations. In fact, Domex is not only engaged in providing sanitation, but also in increasing access to it. Its Social Mission programme, launched in 2009, involves partnerships with organizations such as UNICEF with a target to help build a ‘clean, safe toilet for all’. Domex is not only a brand delivering functional performances, but also a brand with a purpose and a real commitment towards Hygiene for all.

About Hindustan Unilever Limited

Hindustan Unilever Limited (HUL) is India's largest Fast Moving Consumer Goods company touching the lives of two out of three Indians. HUL works to create a better future every day. We help people feel good, look good and get more out of life with brands and services that are good for them and good for others.

Media Contacts

Email: mediacentre.hul@unilever.com

Telephone: Prasad Pradhan at +91 22 39832429 and R Ram at +91 22 39832413

Follow us on Twitter @HUL_News and on Website at www.hul.co.in

Media Contacts

Email: mediacentre.hul@unilever.com

Telephone: Prasad Pradhan at +91 22 39832429 and R Ram at +91 22 39832413

Follow us on Twitter @HUL_News and on Website at www.hul.co.in

Open defecation is one of the biggest concern of India.
Around 597 million people defecate in the open, thereby
increasing the risk of microbial contamination of water(bacteria, viruses, amoeba)
which causes diseases like diarrhoea. We have taken an initiative to
make villages in Maharashtra and Orissa open defecation free zones.
For every Click- contribution received on the website,
we contribute Rs.5 towards this noble cause

This initiative impacts kids like Babli who have to defecate
in the open, where they are exposed to bacteria and viruses which
leads to dangerous diseases like diarrhoea. Diarrhoea and worm
are two major health conditions that affect school age children
impacting their education.
Due to such diseases, 443 million school days are lost every year

  • Health impact due to lack of sanitation.

    * 20% of deaths among children under-14 are due to diseases caused by
    poor sanitation and hygiene.
    * Almost 28 million school children across India do not have access to school
    toilet facilities.
    * 7 states in India (Orissa, Meghalaya, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Assam,
    Uttar Pradesh and Bihar)
    account for almost 50% (13.8 million) children without access to toilet facilities in schools.
    * Only 6 per cent of rural children less than five years of age use toilets.
    * 443 million school days are lost every year due lack of access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene.
    * India has the highest numbers of under-five deaths globally

  • The Millennium Development Goal Target.

    Basic sanitation, subjects of toilets, latrines,
    hand wash is part of the Millennium Development Goal
    At current rates of progress,67% coverage
    will be reached in 2015.

    Nutrition and stunting

    25% of stunting of children at 2 years of age is
    because of Diarrhoea

    Accelerated improvement in the sanitation
    sector will help reach the goals faster.

  • The Indian Crisis.

    626 million Indians defecate in the open -
    the highest number of people practising open defecation in the world.

    215,000 children under five die from Diarrhoeal diseases every year.

    India has the highest numbers of under-five deaths globally.
    Nearly half of the Indian children under five years of age are stunted.

    source: http://www.poo2loo.com/fact-and-stats.php

FOOD BEFORE TOILETS FOR THIS FAMILY IN JUNAPANI.

Meena, a mother of two, talks about how her financial circumstances will not allow her
to consider building a toilet at the moment. It is a secondary consideration, an investment
she will make if offered at a reasonable cost.

Meena Kinkar is sitting outside, watching her children play in the mud. She smiles at them
and looks at us wanting to initiate a conversation. It is not unusual to see people sitting outside
in the afternoon especially during this season; the onset of winters. It is the time when people
like to relax, chit-chat, play with their children or just sit idle. Staring on the road as if they
expect someone to come and meet them.

A mother of two young boys, she is a daily wage labor who doesn't want a toilet simply because
she won't be able to pay the monthly installment of the loan. "I don't save more than 300 rupees
a month, what will I eat and what will I do incase of emergency", says Meena.

As to why she doesn't feel the need for a toilet, she says "I have 2 sons; we never go to a doctor
(except for the elder one, his stomach is always upset and I don't think it's because of the
absence of a toilet), I don't think my problems are because of no toilet." Meena is beginning
to see however that having a toilet at some time will be a good thing for her family.
"I think it will be good to have one. Maybe in a years' time or if someone can
reduce the cost of a good toilet, I will buy myself a toilet", she says.

FAMILIES IN JUNAPANI DO NOT THINK A TOILET IS A NECESSITY.

Mr. Chopra talks about how access to a consumer loan has helped him make up his mind
to build a toilet, yet he does not see it as a necessity.

“Two years ago, when we constructed a toilet with the help of a government scheme,
it was a different experience for us and slowly we got used to it” says Mr. Chopra.
“Little did we know that our toilet would break and we would be left to defecate in open again”.
He goes on to talk about the struggles of defecating in the open, especially during the rainy
when it is not easy at all. “What can we do when we don’t have money”, he continues.

Mr. Chopra owns 4 acres of land, the income from which is used to cover the cost of
studies for his younger son. His younger son has been forcing him to construct a good toilet,
ever since the one constructed earlier broke. “My elder son doesn’t ask for it, only my younger one does,
hence I am delaying the construction”, he shares. “Now that I have access to finance through
a consumer loan, I am building a toilet.”

He also confesses that open defecation is a practice that they are accustomed to and
that it does not have a harmful effect at all on them. He says “We all have been defecating in
the open and even eating vegetables grown in dirty water. Nothing has happened to us,
we are only constructing the toilet because everybody is and my son wants one.”

HOW BUILDING A TOILET HELPED ONE FAMILY LEAD A BETTER LIFE.

Ramoo Sahoo talks about how having a toilet has played a great role in enhancing the social status
of her family.

Ramoo Sahoo, has three daughters and lives in Oshtopur, Orissa. "Initially, we never really
thought of toilet as a primary need" she says, "but recently we'd started facing many health
issues due toopen defecation which was only increasing our medical expenditure". In addition to
this, there is a lack of safety and self -esteem associated with defecating in the open.

Ramoo decided to construct a toilet, realizing that having a toilet in the house is important
to lead a better life. "We don't have to worry about time anymore" she says. She also cites how earlier,
a lot of time was spent going to the field and they were always unsure about going out in the night.
"Now, we have time for more constructive work and we do not have to worry about being in an
uncomfortable environment – this has also reduced a lot of mental pressure", says Ramoo.

We are a family of 5 and we use a single toilet, with each member taking turns to maintain
the cleanliness of the toilet. We are now more concerned about our personal hygiene and health.
Mrs. Sahoo says, the toilet has also given them dignity and recognition in the community.

FOOD BEFORE TOILETS FOR THIS FAMILY IN JUNAPANI.

Meena, a mother of two, talks about how her financial circumstances will not allow her to consider building a toilet at the moment. It is a secondary consideration, an investment she will make if offered at a reasonable cost.

READ MORE

FAMILIES IN JUNAPANI DO NOT THINK A TOILET IS A NECESSITY.

“Two years ago, when we constructed a toilet with the help of a government scheme, it was a different experience for us and slowly we got used to it” says Mr. Chopra. “Little did we know that our toilet would break and we would be left to..

READ MORE

HOW BUILDING A TOILET HELPED ONE FAMILY LEAD A BETTER LIFE.

Ramoo Sahoo, has three daughters and lives in Oshtopur, Orissa. "Initially, we never really thought of toilet as a primary need" she says, "but recently we'd started facing many health issues due to open defecation ..

READ MORE

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SAVLI - 21 TOLETS BUILT
Families in junapani do not think that a toilet is necessary
READ MORE

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  • The partnership

    The Unilever Foundation and Domex have joined forces with UNICEF to help improve access to basic sanitation for hundreds of thousands of people in areas that need it most. By supporting UNICEF’s Community Approaches to Total Sanitation (CATS) programme, the Unilever Foundation and Domex aim to improve the health and well-being of those in need and create sustainable approaches to improved sanitation through programmes that promote good hygiene practices, improve the health and well-being of communities, help create demand for access to toilets and raise awareness of the sanitation crisis. As part of this partnership, Domex is giving its consumers the opportunity to help improve access to basic sanitation through contributing 5% of its proceeds from the sale of specially marked bottles of Domex to support UNICEF’s CATS programmes

    The Community Approaches to Total Sanitation Programme

    The UNICEF Community Approaches to Total Sanitation (CATS) programme is a behaviour change programme that promotes good hygiene practices, helps create demand for access to toilets and raises awareness of the sanitation crisis.

  • Our Aim

    CATS aims to promote the demand for sanitation at the community level.

  • How are we doing this?

    Community members help oversee the construction of toilets in their communities and in many cases the surrounding communities too. There are three core elements to the CATS programme:

    Triggering: Creating a demand for toilets by educating the community about the state of open defecation.

    Behaviour Change: Stopping open defecation out of a sense of responsibility and concern.

    Promoting Sanitation: Promoting mainstream behaviour through mass media and messaging in schools and health centres.

    Measurement of Success: Open Defecation Free (ODF) status is achieved when all families are using their own toilet facilities.

  • HUL ANNOUNCES LAUNCH OF DOMEX TOILET ACADEMY
    TO BUILD 24,000 TOILETS BY 2015

    Mumbai, November 18, 2013

    - Domex, the leading toilet cleaner brand of Hindustan Unilever Lever (HUL), has announced the launch of Domex Toilet Academy (DTA) to mark the occasion of World Toilet Day , November 19. The academy aims to build 24,000 toilets by 2015 in areas faced with the problem of open defecation and where people do not have access to improved sanitation. Domex Toilet Academy is also partnering with the local self help groups to spread awareness among villagers.

    Domex Toilet Academy

    The Domex Toilet Academy programme aims to become a sustainable and long-term solution to sanitation that benefits the local community and helps stimulate the local economy. The Academies provide business skills and training to local entrepreneurs and masons to supply latrines to their local communities.